22 Flouch – Holmfirth

Flouch to Holmfirth 8.75 miles (14Km.)

Sign on old road

Sign on old road

Today the wind had thankfully dropped and the terrain was less exposed, with a maximum height some 150 metres less than yesterday. Total ascent is 282 m while total descent 419 m, this must mean we are going downhill. While the terrain looked better the rain was not and it persisted all day, I’ll no doubt mention this again.

Bridge over River Don

Bridge over River Don

From ‘A History of Penistone and District’ I learn that the Flouch Inn was known as the New Inn when the original building was completed in 1827. It is suggested that it acquired its present name after it was renamed the Plough and in due course some of the paint peeled off the first and fifth letters of the pub sign when it humorously became known as the Flouch.

Carlecotes

Carlecotes

The Old Flouch, presumably the inn completed in 1827 but now a house, stands opposite. We set off along the old Manchester Road, no parking allowed. We’re in Barnsley so any footpaths complaints to that authority. I have been submitting reports of any problems but it does get difficult sometimes to determine where they need to go. As we use the bridleway along the edge of the access land I try to imagine what conditions would be like had the adjacent water course not been cleared out. Hundreds of gallons flash past us until finally it passes through a stone culvert under the path and tumbles into the valley on our right to meet the waters of the river Don just beyond the old rail line.

Handy pipes?

Handy pipes?

The Trans Pennine trail along the old Sheffield to Manchester is worth exploring but I would recommend that be done with a bicycle another day. I nearly missed the path by St Anns church at Carlecotes as its not shown as Definitive on my map, although it has waymarks on the ground. John pressed on through the farm and we met up at the road.

Awaiting restoration

Awaiting restoration

After a short road walk we turn left and took a bridleway by an old quarry. No houses close by but a bus stop, seat and litter bin must be for the convenience of ramblers. Our guide offers the chimney marked ‘Hepworth’ as a waymark but Fred Dibnah must have been here. We know the works are close by when we pass a pile of broken clay drainage pipes, they’ll come in handy, one day.

Hepworth - Building Products

Hepworth - Building Products

At Ox Lee an old house awaiting restoration has at least one amenity, running water, almost in the front door and out the back. We’re invited to ‘Rest a while’ on a small plot when we next meet a road but there’s no shelter, just a reminder of ‘Hepworth Building Products’ among the multitude of signs here and on the farm building.

A delighful path

A delighful path

We are promised a “most delightful walk” along a permissive path which is now Definitive and part of the Kirklees Way. It’s certainly impressive today as the New Mill Dike races down the tiny gorge. One benefit of rain, it provides some impressive water falls. Thankful for the work that has been carried out to keep us above the water we press on making use of the bridges funded by the Peak and Northern Footpath Society, that is until we reach the stepping stones! No way could we cross so we abandon the valley and take the path through Morton Wood and rejoin the GEW missing out Scholes and the adjoining settlement of Paris.

Flooded stepping stones

Flooded stepping stones

We arrived in Holmfirth and yes it was still raining but the tourists were there and John had to wait his turn to pose in front of Sid’s cafe before we found an establishment serving something a little stronger.

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Map of section 22

Map of section 22

Section 22 - the work

Section 22 - the work


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